Pesticide Resources

The Pesticide Safety Education Program offers training programs for Worker Protection Standards and resources for consumers. Information is provided through programs and online fact sheets.

Bugs

Bed Bugs

Bed bugs are small, blood-eating pests that belong to the family of Cimicidae. Adult bed bugs have flat, oval-shaped bodies, and are about 5mm in length. Their width is about that of accredit card, allowing them to squeeze themselves in tight hiding places. They are a caramel color to a deep red-brown color. Young bed bugs, or nymphs, are smaller and more translucent in color. Bed bug infestations are seen world-wide. They can be tricky to identify, and quite difficult to remove. Bed bugs can be found in many public places, such as hotels, gyms, movie theaters, offices, and stores. An adult female will lay up to 500 eggs in her life times. [see more]

Termites

It is common to confuse termites with carpenter ants. Both are similar appearance, both nest in the spring, and both seem to enjoy nesting in wood. While similar in appearance, they differ in the damage they do to homes. Termites are an extremely costly structural insect pest in Connecticut. [see more]

Pesticides

What is a Pesticide?

According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), a pesticide is any substance or mixture of substances intended to prevent, repel, destroy, or mitigate pests. The term “pesticide” is an umbrella term for pest management products and includes, insecticides, herbicides, fungicides, rodenticides and bactericides.Other pesticides include commonly used household products many of which are biological agents like disinfectants, antimicrobials and sanitizers; other non-biological agents are insect repellents and animal repellents.

Toxicity of Pesticides

Pesticides can be harmful to humans. Pesticides are designed to be toxic to something that is a pest, and some pesticides can cause sickness in humans. Pesticides can cause sickness, toxicity, mutations, and unfortunately, even death to those who have been exposed. Therefore, reading labels and understanding how to properly apply pesticides is important. [see more]

Reducing Pesticide use in Sensitive Areas

Sensitive areas refer to place where children, animals, the elderly, or immunocompromised individuals spend a sufficient amount of time. They can be open public spaces, such as parks or playgrounds, or they could include more confined areas such as hospitals, elderly care facilities, airplanes, prisons, or zoos. Pesticides used around these areas could cause a public health concern, so it is important that the pesticide applicators take precautions when spraying, laying traps, or sanitizing these areas. [see more]

Hiring a Pest Control Professional

Before hiring a pest control professional, do some research.Identify the pest. If you are not certain of the pest’s identity, contact your local Cooperative Extension office or county agricultural commissioner’s office. Obtain recommendations from neighbors, friends, or family about pest control services they have used. Call at least three companies and consider their methods as well as their customer service policy. For example, are there fewer toxic alternatives available? [see more]

The Pesticide Label

Pesticide labels are intended to inform users how to safely and legally apply pesticides. All labels contain the statement “It is a violation of Federal law to use this product in a manner inconsistent with its labeling.” This means that the labels are legally enforceable. The information on these labels are critical to maintaining safe pesticide use. [see more]

Pesticide Applicator Resources

Other Pesticide Resources:

Pesticides registered in Connecticut can be found here: CT DEEP Kelly Registrations

National Registered Pesticide Database: EPA Pesticide Program Label System

UConn Integrated Pest Management: https://ipm.cahnr.uconn.edu/root-diseases-of-brambles/

Public Health

Public Health and Pesticides

Antimicrobials are any substances of natural, semi-synthetic or synthetic origins that kills or inhibits the growth of microorganisms but causes little or no damage to the host. Antimicrobial products contain about 275 different active ingredients and are marketed in many types of formulations including: sprays, liquids, concentrated powders, and gases. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulates antimicrobial products as pesticides. [see more]

Pets and Pesticides

Pesticides are commonly applied to homes and yards, where pets spend a large amount of time. Pets may be affected by toxins just as humans can, and sometimes even more so, depending on the size of the animal. [see more]

Reducing Pesticide use in Sensitive Areas

Sensitive areas refer to place where children, animals, the elderly, or immunocompromised individuals spend a sufficient amount of time. They can be open public spaces, such as parks or playgrounds, or they could include more confined areas such as hospitals, elderly care facilities, airplanes, prisons, or zoos. Pesticides used around these areas could cause a public health concern, so it is important that the pesticide applicators take precautions when spraying, laying traps, or sanitizing these areas. [see more]

Preventing Pest Problems

Follow these tips to help prevent pesky pests from entering your home or business space: [see more]

What's Under Your Sink?

Cleaning a home is important to maintain good health and sanitation. But sometimes, the ingredients in the cleaning supplies we use can be hazardous. Since cleaning supplies are not meant to be ingested, regulations on their ingredients are often slim. There are many potentially dangerous chemicals in your home. [see more]

Mold Control

Mold can be found everywhere in nature but becomes a problem when it begins growing indoors. Mold can drastically change indoor air quality. The key to keeping mold under control is to keep moisture under control. If mold is a problem in your home, you should clean up the mold promptly and fix the water problem. It is important to dry water-damaged areas and items within 24-48 hours to prevent mold growth.

Reduce indoor humidity (to 30-60%) to decrease mold growth by:

  • Venting bathrooms, dryers and other moisture-generating sources to the outside
  • Using air conditioners and de-humidifiers
  • Increasing ventilation
  • Using exhaust fans whenever cooking, dishwashing and cleaning

If you believe you have a mold problem, it is important to search for the source, and fix it as soon as possible. Take the EPA’s Interactive Mold House Tour!

Insects

Reducing Mosquito Populations around the Home

Mosquitoes are pesky and irritating. But they are also prone to carry diseases, so mosquito control is important. Mosquitoes undergo four stages of life: egg, larva, pupa, and adult. Mosquito control involves disrupting certain parts of their life cycle. This may reduce the number of mosquitoes around your home and community. Some control involves disrupting the egg and larva stages. [see more]

Using Insect Repellants Safely

Insect repellents are very helpful in repelling pesky insects but require proper and safe use. Follow these tips when applying and using insect repellents: [see more]

Spinosed

What is Spinosed? Spinosed is a natural substance made by a soil bacterium that can be toxic to insects such as ants, mosquitoes, fruit flies, leaf miners, and head lice. It effects the nervous system of insects when they touch or eat it.It eventually kills the insect, but this may take some time. [see more]